Storm Cells

Those who’ve read any Charles Fort (I’ll be writing about him shortly) will know that over the centuries there has been, from all corners of the globe, no shortage of reports of odd things falling from the sky – frogs, fish, stones, sheets of ice, mysterious slime, etc. One of the more common accounts is of showers of blood.

These stories are often either dismissed as fabrications, or explained away in various unhelpful ways. One such “scientific explanation” of the shower-of-blood phenomenon, for example, was “a fine mist of blood cells produced by a meteor striking a high-flying flock of bats”. Usually, of course, they are simply swept under the rug and forgotten.

Now comes a noteworthy development from India, where one Godfrey Louis, a physicist at Mahatma Gandhi University, has collected some samples from a red rain that fell in Kerala, and upon examining them has found what appear to be some very strange microbes. They are small – about 10 microns in diameter – and reproduce even under harsh conditions, even though they appear not to contain any DNA. Louis has suggested that they may be of extraterrestrial origin, and may be evidence of panspermia (the notion that life on Earth was seeded by otherworldy molecules). An investigation is underway.

Read more here.

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