Kumbaya

I’m trying to hang on to that “magnanimous” feeling tonight.

It’s not going so well.

8 Comments

  1. Alex Leibowitz says

    Montaigne’s essay on pity is worth re-reading.

    Posted November 11, 2016 at 12:23 am | Permalink
  2. Kevin Kim says

    I spent two weeks in Portland. Lots of homeless, hipsters, and druggies—three overlapping circles in the Venn diagram. Plenty of normal folk as well, along with an abundance of good eateries. I thought the city was mellower than this, although I’m not totally surprised.

    Posted November 11, 2016 at 12:38 am | Permalink
  3. Alex,

    Which of Montaigne’s essays is “on pity”? I don’t see one with the word “pity” in its title.

    Posted November 11, 2016 at 1:54 am | Permalink
  4. Alex Leibowitz says

    Henry,

    “That Men By Various Ways Arrive At The Same End.” The subject is pity, anyway.

    I lived in Portland for 5 years. Went to Reed College.

    Posted November 11, 2016 at 2:17 am | Permalink
  5. Whitewall says

    Democrats in their natural (subsidized) state of mind. Blue Governing Model on display.

    Posted November 11, 2016 at 7:11 am | Permalink
  6. Whitewall says

    Amazing what “deep research” can predict:

    http://legalinsurrection.com/2016/11/research-guru-saw-trump-phenomenon-coming-before-anyone-else/

    Uncanny!

    Posted November 11, 2016 at 9:43 am | Permalink
  7. J Clivas says

    I would never attend a college named after an American Bolshevik.

    Posted November 11, 2016 at 11:20 am | Permalink
  8. Alex Leibowitz says

    Clicks, sir or madam, I believe it was named after a Portland businessman in 1908

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simeon_Gannett_Reed

    There are many Reeds in America.

    The college has its eccentricities, but I attended it because of its Humanities curriculum. For the moment it still requires all freshman study the Greek and Roman classics (which I went on to major in), and offers similar programs in early modern, modern, and Chinese civilization.

    Of course politically and ethically, I anticipate you wouldn’t find its atmosphere agreeable. But if you want to remain on courteous and civil terms with a man, you would do well not to cast aspersions on his alma mater. I recognize there are things to be said against it, especially in this society, but I would ask you allow me to reserve that privilege for myself.

    Posted November 11, 2016 at 9:56 pm | Permalink