Soup And Sandwich

An interesting item over the transom this morning from our reader and commenter The Big Henry:

Data Mining Indian Recipes Reveals New Food Pairing Phenomenon

I’d never even heard of this ‘food pairing’ business. It uses chemical analysis to determine which foods have shared ‘flavor components’, and should go well together.

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15 Comments

  1. Whitewall says

    I’ve heard of beverage pairing or selection, but not this. Nonetheless, I’m fine with it if they promise to go lite on the curry.

    Posted February 27, 2015 at 12:11 pm | Permalink
  2. “… go lite on the curry.”

    Flattery works for me, WW.

    :)

    Posted February 27, 2015 at 12:24 pm | Permalink
  3. Whitewall says

    Henry, I see what you mean. It was simply more than my minimal abilities would allow for me to add that “e”. Maybe omitting the “e” causes less sneezing after consuming?

    Posted February 27, 2015 at 1:15 pm | Permalink
  4. JK says

    Snails are good with …

    http://boingboing.net/2015/02/27/snail-eats-lunch-its-weird.html

    Posted February 27, 2015 at 2:12 pm | Permalink
  5. WW,

    My intended pun was a reference to “curry favor”, as in “flatter”.

    Posted February 27, 2015 at 4:47 pm | Permalink
  6. Whitewall says

    Henry, I caught it.

    Posted February 27, 2015 at 4:59 pm | Permalink
  7. I usually eat more than two things, so this food pairing business is not to my taste.

    Jeffery Hodges

    * * *

    Posted February 27, 2015 at 5:54 pm | Permalink
  8. HJH,

    Are you treying to say that pairing is insufficient for you?

    Posted February 27, 2015 at 7:39 pm | Permalink
  9. Yes, and I’m also treying to say it ain’t kosher!

    Jeffery Hodges

    * * *

    Posted February 27, 2015 at 8:35 pm | Permalink
  10. So you are saying that’s treif-ing?

    Are trifling with me, HJH?

    Posted February 27, 2015 at 9:49 pm | Permalink
  11. An “f” is a trifling thing.

    But let me ask (seriously) – was “trey” incorrect? I thought I’d seen it as a variant for “treyf.”

    Jeffery Hodges

    * * *

    Posted February 27, 2015 at 10:37 pm | Permalink
  12. HJH,

    In spoken Yiddish, the “f” is always pronounced. Transliteration, however, might be less stringent in this regard (I’m not sure).

    Posted February 28, 2015 at 2:37 pm | Permalink
  13. BTW, Yiddish was the lingua franca in the post-WWII displaced persons (DP) camps in the American Occupation Zone in West Germany (where General Eisenhower was “Viceroy”, just as General MacArthur was in Japan). It was the third language I learned to speak (after Polish and Russian). English became my fourth language at age 7.

    Posted February 28, 2015 at 2:49 pm | Permalink
  14. Can you still speak Russian and Polish?

    Jeffery Hodges

    * * *

    Posted February 28, 2015 at 5:42 pm | Permalink
  15. No. I haven’t spoken anything but English since we came to America in 1949. My parents continued to speak a mix of Polish and English (but only to each other at home), so if I hear someone speaking Polish I can understand what they are saying (provided they speak slowly and enunciate). But even that ability has been fading since both my parents passed away.

    My Russian came about right after the Red Army drove the Germans out of Poland, but that only lasted until we migrated into the American Occupation Zone in West Germany, whereupon I began to speak Yiddish in the DP camps. That only lasted from about 1946 to 1949.

    Posted February 28, 2015 at 6:08 pm | Permalink